You Don't Know How Beautiful You Are

14 notes

oankalii asked: Hi! My name is Langston; I just recently started following you. What makes you want to to be a librarian?

sslibrarianship:

jamiebrarian:

afrofuturistlibrarian2904:

Hi! I like your name. I noticed you following me because I love Ned’s Declassified.

There are many things that make me want to be a librarian:

There is wayyy more going on with libraries and librarians than you think. There are many many different types of librarians. People are usually super confused when I tell them I hardly ever touch the books.

I am very interested in open access publishing because I think education and research should be available to everyone. Also, I have been a writer in some capacity since I was 16 so I care about author’s rights.

I am a fairly progressive person and I like being in a profession where these ideas are normal and advocated for. That is not to say librarians are perfect about this, but they try.

Also, it’s a profession that has a sense of community, support and professional development. Lots and lots of conferences and funding toward professional development. It’s about helping people find resources and not about profit. 

It is a profession that recognizes it needs a diverse workforce. I’m diverse! hooray! I have felt supported and needed for my perspective, but also condescension and blindness to some things. 

And finally, because I’m a bit nerdy and like putting things where they belong! Don’t judge me!

these are all great reasons!!

Hear, hear!

12 notes

sslibrarianship:

apparently hobnobs make me work harder. it’s not even 11am and i’ve already gotten SO MUCH done - and i attribute all of it to the 5 dark chocolate hobnobs that constituted my morning snack. BRAIN FOOD!

May have to have an experiment of my own. I love Hobnobs!

231 notes

elloellenoh:

disabilityinkidlit:

goldenheartedrose:

dysfunctionalqueer:

goldenheartedrose:

weneeddiversebooks:

justsitstill:

weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series! If you liked The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, try Marcelo in the  Real World by Francesco X. Stork because both are fabulous stories about autism spectrum boys finding their way in the world.

I don’t agree with how the characters in these books are described as “autism spectrum boys.” A more inclusive description would be, “boys with autism spectrum disorder.” Generally, when referring to an individual with an exceptionality or special needs, don’t say “_____ boy/girl/person/etc.”, say “boy/girl/person/etc. with _____.” The former description erases the fact that the person is a unique individual on their own; instead they become their exceptionality first and then a person after.
Moreover, one of the reasons I love Marcelo in the Real World so much is because it’s not a book that features a character with ASD and then proceeds to point at the fact that he has autism for the entire book. When you read the book, it’s not like you’re left with the impression that all Marcelo has to offer to the story is his ASD. No- this story is about Marcelo, who has many facets to his personhood, trying to come to terms with complicated moral questions.
I just think it’s important to think about the words we use and how we use them.
But, regardless, I’m happy that the We Need Diverse Books team is bringing this wonderful novel to the attention of more people! Seriously, it’s a must read!

Good point! Thank you for clarifying!

I’m going to disagree 100% with justsitstill. The autistic community in general prefers to not use person-first language in referring to ourselves and each other. We say “autistic person”, and we don’t say “person with autism”. Autism colors our lives in a way that can’t be easily separated. That doesn’t mean that it’s the only thing about us, but if you wouldn’t say “person with queerness/gayness” or “person with womanhood” or “person with blondeness”, don’t use “person with autism” either. Side note: You will still find many educators, especially in the fields of teaching/childcare/social work/psychology will still use “person with autism” or “person with x disability” instead of “autistic” or “disabled”. But that doesn’t make them right. Here are some links:http://autisticadvocacy.org/identity-first-language/http://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=identity+first+language+autism+community&hl=en&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1&oi=scholart&sa=X&ei=zX7aU56-A5CzyASrsIKgBg&ved=0CBsQgQMwAAhttp://yesthattoo.blogspot.com/p/dont-call-me-person-with-autism.html

Also The Curious Incident of the Boy and Nighttime is a terrible ableist book about autistic people. I personally find it appaling that it’s considered a good representation of an autistic character. 

Yes, it really really is. However, I think the fact that the book is popular is why it’s being used as a launching off point to recommend the second book, which is a lot better (so I’ve heard from other autistic folks).

Ah! I see that someone else has also made this point already.
With regards to Marcelo in the Real World, s.e. smith reviewed this novel for Disability in Kidlit last year. Conclusion: mostly a thumbs up!
I personally reviewed it as well and was somewhat less enthused.
Both these reviews are by autistic people, as is Disability in Kidlit policy. 

The dialogue that is happening is so important that we have to repost it. Thank you all for contributing to this discussion so that we all can learn from it.

elloellenoh:

disabilityinkidlit:

goldenheartedrose:

dysfunctionalqueer:

goldenheartedrose:

weneeddiversebooks:

justsitstill:

weneeddiversebooks:

#WeNeedDiverseBooks summer reading series! If you liked The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time, try Marcelo in the  Real World by Francesco X. Stork because both are fabulous stories about autism spectrum boys finding their way in the world.

I don’t agree with how the characters in these books are described as “autism spectrum boys.” A more inclusive description would be, “boys with autism spectrum disorder.” Generally, when referring to an individual with an exceptionality or special needs, don’t say “_____ boy/girl/person/etc.”, say “boy/girl/person/etc. with _____.” The former description erases the fact that the person is a unique individual on their own; instead they become their exceptionality first and then a person after.

Moreover, one of the reasons I love Marcelo in the Real World so much is because it’s not a book that features a character with ASD and then proceeds to point at the fact that he has autism for the entire book. When you read the book, it’s not like you’re left with the impression that all Marcelo has to offer to the story is his ASD. No- this story is about Marcelo, who has many facets to his personhood, trying to come to terms with complicated moral questions.

I just think it’s important to think about the words we use and how we use them.

But, regardless, I’m happy that the We Need Diverse Books team is bringing this wonderful novel to the attention of more people! Seriously, it’s a must read!

Good point! Thank you for clarifying!

I’m going to disagree 100% with justsitstill. The autistic community in general prefers to not use person-first language in referring to ourselves and each other. We say “autistic person”, and we don’t say “person with autism”. Autism colors our lives in a way that can’t be easily separated. That doesn’t mean that it’s the only thing about us, but if you wouldn’t say “person with queerness/gayness” or “person with womanhood” or “person with blondeness”, don’t use “person with autism” either.

Side note: You will still find many educators, especially in the fields of teaching/childcare/social work/psychology will still use “person with autism” or “person with x disability” instead of “autistic” or “disabled”. But that doesn’t make them right.

Here are some links:

http://autisticadvocacy.org/identity-first-language/

http://scholar.google.com/scholar?q=identity+first+language+autism+community&hl=en&as_sdt=0&as_vis=1&oi=scholart&sa=X&ei=zX7aU56-A5CzyASrsIKgBg&ved=0CBsQgQMwAA

http://yesthattoo.blogspot.com/p/dont-call-me-person-with-autism.html

Also The Curious Incident of the Boy and Nighttime is a terrible ableist book about autistic people. I personally find it appaling that it’s considered a good representation of an autistic character. 

Yes, it really really is. However, I think the fact that the book is popular is why it’s being used as a launching off point to recommend the second book, which is a lot better (so I’ve heard from other autistic folks).

Ah! I see that someone else has also made this point already.

With regards to Marcelo in the Real World, s.e. smith reviewed this novel for Disability in Kidlit last year. Conclusion: mostly a thumbs up!

I personally reviewed it as well and was somewhat less enthused.

Both these reviews are by autistic people, as is Disability in Kidlit policy. 

The dialogue that is happening is so important that we have to repost it. Thank you all for contributing to this discussion so that we all can learn from it.

(via weneeddiversebooks)

0 notes

Whelp, it is yet another evening that I have stayed up WAY TOO LATE on the course discussion threads and reblogging crap. Whelp, I was going to be tired from the heat already, why not just cut another hour off my sleep schedule.

Today I biked home in jeans rolled to the knee because I forgot my shorts at home like an ABSOLUTE IDIOT on the hottest day of the year so far, and I am silly. Then I came home and ate a freezie in my basement wearing not jeans and it was marv and now I’m going to bed also not wearing jeans or other things. and the awesome thing about summer is you can sleep in less than you normally do and still not be cold.

60,348 notes

The basic plot, which cannot be ignored even in the films, is that Harry, Hermione and Ron give up everything for their political struggle. They drop out of high school, they go illegal, defy the government, belong to an underground organization [The Order of the Phoenix], operate out of safe houses and forests and even raid offices of the government and banking offices. This is all done in principled opposition to the Dark Wizard Voldemort and a corrupt bureaucratized government that has been heavily infiltrated with his evil minions. This is revolutionary activity. But the movie version does not present it as such or emphasize these radical aspects of the plot, thereby entirely missing the dramatic sweep and action present in the first half of the last novel.

The novels recognize the importance of alternative media for political struggle. The mainstream press [The Daily Prophet] is shown as unreliable and unprincipled, eventually deteriorating into a fear-mongering propaganda machine for the Voldemort-controlled bureaucracy. For a while the alternative but above ground media [The Quibbler] publishes the real news, but it ceases to print after the daughter of the publisher is kidnapped. In the book, friends of Harry [Lee Jordan, with Fred and George Weasley as frequent guests] start broadcasting the real news from an underground radio station, encrypted with a password. This radio station becomes a critical link for the resistance, which is scattered and weak. Although we are treated to some radio broadcast updates in the movie, they are delivered by a disembodied and professional sounding voice, not our friends the Weasleys. This undermines the important message - a guiding principle behind the media coop - that in a serious situation it becomes necessary to produce your own media and not to rely on ‘professionals’.

The novel makes it clear that in this phase of the struggle the characters romantic lives take a backseat to their political activity, as Harry breaks up with the love of his life [Ginny Weasley] so as to avoid making her a target for Voldemort’s forces, who are known to use torture and kidnapping as tactics. The ‘love triangle’ that becomes the focus of the movie isn’t even really present in the books. In the books, the relationship between Harry and Hermione is totally platonic - Ron is shown as jealous, but the feeling is entirely without foundation. In the book Harry says to Ron: “I love her like a sister and I reckon she feels the same way about me. It’s always been like that. I thought you knew” (pg 378, DH US Hardback). This conveys that men and women can be close comrades and friends without being involved romantically. But in the film, Harry and Hermione are shown dancing romantically, and Harry’s line to Ron about his brotherly feeling towards Hermione does not even make it into the film. This completely undermines the important message that jealousy is counter-productive and has toxic effects, which is an important feminist message for young people.

How Hollywood Defanged Potter’s Radical Politics  (via girl-germs)

Worth a repost

(via wolvensnothere)

HP is one of the most fundamentally anti-establishment, anti-authoritarian, radical books in a WHILE. The books are incredibly diverse in race and gender, including villains. While everyone was screaming about Pullman, and hanging their hats on the witchcraft in HP, Rowling basically put out a roadmap of revolutiinary youth.

Everyone likes to pull the, “Deatheaters are Nazis,” subtext but if you look at the timeline of the text and publication, it’s pretty clear that politically, this is an England/Ireland/Scotland/Wales under Tory rule and in the midst of the Troubles & Thatcherism from the start, with subsequent books written and published in a post-9/11 world.

Rowling wrote the root, branch, and flower of politics and power creating death and despair, where love and unity by choice were the strongest powers. There are reasons for that.

(via carnivaloftherandom)

Not saying there aren’t problems with HP because there are, but yes political revolutionaries!

(Source: itchesandtugs, via thecommonlibrarian)